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Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

Aniello Piacente’s Cammeo - Artisan

The creation of cameo requires ancient instruments and techniques. Firstly, the artisan works the shell from which they obtain the cameo. Then, they burn and carve it with great precision. 

  Country:  Italy


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Bags from Rugs

Bags from Rugs

-Since the middle ages people used the weaver to make clothes for the household. They used old clothes and textiles that were worn out to make rugs for household use. Then those rugs could also be used to make heavy duty bags to be used in the household use.

The bags from rugs started becoming pieces of art since they had patterns and designs that made them unique in each area and in local fairs and expositions they started selling them as items to be used and displayed as well.


  Country:  Cyprus


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Blueprint manufacture

Blueprint manufacture

The history of origin in Slovakia dates back to the 18th century, especially in areas around Orava and Spiš, where the cloth was used and the main production material was canvas.

Blueprint has become an important part of the folk clothing. The fabric used, did not have to be wash frequently and it was not costly, because the print on it was cheap.

The blueprint dyeing technique was applied mainly to the canvas, but other substances were used later, e.g. cotton. The patterns on the fabric were hand painted, but later a wooden or metal stamp was used.

Firstly, the canvas was boiled in water, where calcium hydroxide and soda were added. Later, the cloth was washed in sulfuric acid diluted with water and rinsed in running water. After drying, starching and calendaring, the canvas was ready to print patterns and for colouring. A cover blend, called pap, was used for suppressing, which was applied to the blueprint form. The mentioned form was soaked in a container of pap and then applied to the canvas. After the cover blend had dried, the canvas in parallel folds was hung on an iron structure and immersed for 20-30 minutes into a cold colouring mixture. The basic component in it was indigo. The whole canvas was colored, except for the places where pap was put, which indigo did not accept. The soaking process was repeated several times, because then the colour was darker. After staining, the fabric was placed in a weak sulfuric acid solution to remove the pap and a white pattern formed on a dark blue background.

The use of blueprints was versatile, for example sewing skirts, making blankets, bedding, scarves, aprons, tablecloths, curtains and many more.

  Country:  Slovakia


Bolsas de alfombras

Bolsas de alfombras

Desde la Edad Media, la gente usaba el telar para hacer ropa para el hogar. Usaban ropa y trapos viejos gastados para hacer alfombras para uso doméstico. Estas alfombras también se usaban para hacer bolsas con las que llevar carga pesada.
La tela se desgarraba en trozos y luego se entrelazaban para formar una forma robusta de bolsa, siendo fácil de llevar y lavar en la vida cotidiana. Las bolsas de alfombras comenzaron a convertirse en piezas de artesanía por sus patrones y diseños  únicos, que diferían en cada área. Su exhibición y venta en las ferias y exposiciones locales fomentaron su presencia en los hogares.
La metodología con el telar se usa hasta la fecha y la asociación de artesanía de Chipre está organizando clases para que perdure el conocimiento y el arte para hacer este tipo de piezas.

  Country:  Chipre


Bolsas de tapetes

Bolsas de tapetes

Desde la Edad Media, la gente usaba el telar para hacer ropa para el hogar. Usaban ropa y trapos viejos gastados para hacer tapetes para uso doméstico. Esos tapetes también se usaban para hacer bolsas con las que llevar carga pesada.
Las bolsas de los tapetes comenzaron a convertirse en piezas de artesanía por sus patrones y diseños  únicos, que diferían en cada área. Su exhibición y venta en las ferias y exposiciones locales fomentaron su presencia en los hogares.

  Country:  Chipre


Bolsos de encaje de Lefkara

Bolsos de encaje de Lefkara

Los encajes de Lefkara se usaban para decorar bolsas. La bolsa para damas comenzó a convertirse en una forma de arte y la competencia entre las jóvenes del área ayudó a que estos artículos se convirtieran en piezas de artesanía popular en toda la isla.
Las bolsas comenzaron a ponerse de moda ya que tenían patrones y diseños que únicos. Aún hoy en día se venden en todo Chipre.

  Country:  Municipio de Lefkara, Chipre


Bordado a mano de Lagartera

Bordado a mano de Lagartera

Los bordados son trabajos en relieve realizados en telas ya hechas gracias a una aguja. Las labranderas o costureras trabajan y bordaban a mano telas como paños caseros, en telares manuales con fibra de lino. Las tiras deshilachadas son rectangulares, rematadas en los bordes con la "puntada nupcial".
Los pasos del proceso de la artesanía clásica de Lagartera van desde el deshilachado de la tela, hacer urdimbres, cortar y sacar hilos, coser o hilvanar, hacer el "cuajado" para evitar que los hilos se desenreden y finalmente hacer un dobladillo en los cuatro lados, rematado por un dobladillo especial llamado "repulgo" en Lagartera. Generalmente se usa hilo de lana o hilo de color natural teñido a posteriori. La seda también se usa con frecuencia, especialmente para bordar las cintas de los chevrones que componen atuendo femenino.
Materiales: tejido de lino, algodón, lona o tergal. Hilos de Mouliné, y perlas finas o cintas.
Se sabe de la existencia de un taller de labranderas propiedad de Catalina Fernández Lozano en el barrio Lagarterano de Toledillo, que data del siglo XVI.

  Country:  Castilla-La Mancha, España


Bordado en oro

Bordado en oro

El bordado de oro es un tipo de bordado que utiliza hilos de oro, y en menor medida, de plata. Generalmente se hace en tela, terciopelo o seda.
En un tafetán forrado con una lona resistente, se dibuja el patrón. La tela que se va a bordar está tejida y toda la superficie del patrón está cubierta con hilo dorado o plateado grueso, pasado y asegurado por los dos extremos. Para bordar de esta manera, el artesano necesita hacer rellenos para mejorarlos usando una tarjeta de oro amarillo o hilos retorcidos del mismo color.
La característica principal de este tipo de bordado es que nunca cruza la tela, quedando extendida en su superficie con pequeños puntos de hilos de algodón amarillos, previamente encerados para darle dureza.
Debido a las cruzadas en el siglo XIII, los escudos y otros motivos de caballería comenzaron a bordarse. Otros bordados en oro en  ornamentos religiosos, como casullas y mantos, se usan desde el siglo XVII. Esta artesanía disminuyó notablemente a finales del siglo XVIII, siendo reemplazado en gran medida por la máquina de coser en el siglo XIX.

  Country:  España


Bruges, Belgio, Arte del pizzo

Bruges, Belgio, Arte del pizzo

Il video mostra l'antica arte del pizzo in Belgio, specialmente nelle Fiandre. 

Le sue origini risalgono al Rinascimento anche se ancora oggi centinaia di aritgiane sono presenti a Bruges per mantenere viva questa arte. 

È un processo che richiede molta pazienza e centinaia di spilli. Oggi, il pizzo belga è venduto come souvenir.


  Country:  Bruges, Belgium


Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

The video shows the ancient and precious art of lace making in Belgium, especially in the Flanders.

The origins of the art are dated back to the Renaissance but hundreds of craftswomen still work in Bruges nowadays. It is a very precise and slow process that requires hundreds of pins and a lot of patience.

Today, Belgian lace is sold as a souvenir, but its quality remains that of the time. 


  Country:  Bruges, Belgium


Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

The video shows the ancient and precious art of lace making in Belgium, especially in the Flanders.

The origins of the art are dated back to the Renaissance but hundreds of craftswomen still work in Bruges nowadays. It is a very precise and slow process that requires hundreds of pins and a lot of patience.

Today, Belgian lace is sold as a souvenir, but its quality remains that of the time. 


  Country:  Bruges, Belgium


Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

The video shows the ancient and precious art of lace making in Belgium, especially in the Flanders.

The origins of the art are dated back to the Renaissance but hundreds of craftswomen still work in Bruges nowadays. It is a very precise and slow process that requires hundreds of pins and a lot of patience.

Today, Belgian lace is sold as a souvenir, but its quality remains that of the time. 


  Country:  Bruges, Belgium


Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making

The video shows the ancient and precious art of lace making in Belgium, especially in the Flanders.

The origins of the art are dated back to the Renaissance but hundreds of craftswomen still work in Bruges nowadays. It is a very precise and slow process that requires hundreds of pins and a lot of patience.

Today, Belgian lace is sold as a souvenir, but its quality remains that of the time. 


  Country:  Bruges, Belgium


Bruges, Belgium - Art of Lace Making